Moving House is an Adventure with HIKKOSHI MORE

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Besides creating gijinka or anthropomorphic personifications of nonhuman concepts (try saying that really fast!), the Japanese are also fond of reimagining their myths, legends, and folk tales to suit more modern concepts. Take for example The Tale of Momotaro, The Peach Boy, which has been adapted by moving and relocation company HIKKOSHI MORE to create a fun and lighthearted take on moving house

Moving House is an Adventure with HIKKOSHI MORE

In the original tale, Peach Boy was found floating on a river inside a peach by an elderly couple who adopted him as their son. However, in HIKKOSHI MORE’s version, it’s not a little boy but a cute and curious black cat named Kuronishiki that pops out fully formed from the inside of a peach! Kuronishiki was then adopted by a nice young lady named Momoa.

Moving House is an Adventure with HIKKOSHI MORE

Moving House is an Adventure with HIKKOSHI MORE

At this point, the story diverges from the original version. Momotaro is indeed brave and strong, but he has been a bit of a jerk to all the demons he beat up and banished in the name of justice. Kuronishiki felt really bad for these displaced residents (that’s one way of looking at it, right?) so he helps them find more suitable housing – far away from the threat of Momotaro. All’s well that ends well, I suppose? ^^;;;;;;

Just like the banished oni from The Tale of Momonekotaro, everybody needs a little help when moving from one place to another. It seems challenging enough as it is back here in Manila, but it’s even more stressful in Japan – with their strict leasing and tenancy laws, combined with complicated moving logistics that may seem slightly daunting. To untangle this web of do’s and do not’s, let’s take a quick tour through HIKKOSHI MORE!

Moving House is an Adventure with HIKKOSHI MORE

Moving House is an Adventure with HIKKOSHI MORE

Moving House is an Adventure with HIKKOSHI MORE

One of the first things you should do is establish a timeline for the move, so you can get things done good and early, and not leave anything undone up to the last minute! The very top of your to-do list is to find your new place – whether by yourself or with the help of an agent. You need to figure out where you want to move, and whether you can afford to live there. You also need to sort out your finances as moving will not be cheap – you need to pay the landlord or the real estate company a deposit, an advance, processing fees, legal fees, commissions, and a whole lot more! If you really can’t afford your first choice, now is the time to look at alternatives that are closer to your reach.

Moving House is an Adventure with HIKKOSHI MORE

Moving House is an Adventure with HIKKOSHI MORE

Another important consideration on your timeline – especially if you are not moving alone, is meeting the need of your other family members. Your new home may be in your budget and hits all the items on your personal wish list, but does it fulfil the wish list of your spouse, your child, or your parents? It may be close to your office, but far from supermarkets, shopping districts, schools, or hospitals. It may be in a good neighbourhood with excellent views and ventilation, but is located at the top of a steep slope that is difficult for your aging parents to climb. You are not the only person affected by the move, so you should choose your new home wisely.

Next on your timeline is select a moving company to employ. This is especially important if you do not have an extended family or a network of trusted friends to help you shift your stuff from your current residence to your new one. Don’t just get the cheapest one you can find! Try to look for a service that has good reviews and reasonable rates. Maybe there is a reason the cheap companies charge such low rates – they might not be very careful with how they move your stuff, resulting in broken or misplaced items!

Moving House is an Adventure with HIKKOSHI MORE

One important task in your timeline is sorting and packing! Sorting and packing before a big move feels more stressful and more complicated than – say, packing for a holiday. It’s due to the sheer amount of items you have to sort through, organize, and pack away ready for the moving company. To help cut down on the mess, try employing the Mari Kondo method and only keep the things that you need and bring you joy and satisfaction, and donate or bin the rest. During this period, HIKKOSHI MORE suggests that you stay at a hotel or a friend’s or family member’s place, and not your current home — so you do not feel overwhelmed by the mess of half-sorted and half-packed items.

Moving in is also the perfect time to renovate or refresh the interiors of your new home. Major works such a new coat of paint or new carpeting and tiles must be done before you even move in. This just cuts done on the stress of having renovations done at the same time as the move (which, trust us, is not fun). Even if you are moving to a brand new house or flat, there are still some tweaks you can do here or there to make it perfect. It’s likewise best to get this done before the large furnishings such as couches, beds, and wardrobes make their way into the home.

Moving House is an Adventure with HIKKOSHI MORE

You can also improve your home by adding indoor plants and aromatherapy devices, creating inspiring nooks and crannies for your family members to enjoy their hobbies and personal pursuits, maybe a cork board or two to remind everybody about chores without having to scream at each other all the time (very stressful!). You can also encourage re-using and recycling by setting up a sorting station for rubbish so you can toss only what is absolutely useless and cannot be up-cycled.

For more moving and home-life tips in Japan (and maybe even here at home in Manila!) – head on over to HIKKOSHI MORE! Get some great practical tips (and improve your Japanese?) from the masters of minimalist living, and have fun with Kuronishiki and his adventures in house-hunting!

This post is an advertorial sponsored by HIKKOSHI MORE.

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